• Users Online: 46
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 32-33

Insights from training drive for coronavirus disease-19 vaccination in India


Department of Community Medicine, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission30-Sep-2021
Date of Decision15-Dec-2021
Date of Acceptance19-Dec-2021
Date of Web Publication24-Mar-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Priyanka Sharma
Department of Community Medicine, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jascp.jascp_22_21

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Sharma P, Pardeshi G. Insights from training drive for coronavirus disease-19 vaccination in India. J Appl Sci Clin Pract 2022;3:32-3

How to cite this URL:
Sharma P, Pardeshi G. Insights from training drive for coronavirus disease-19 vaccination in India. J Appl Sci Clin Pract [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 May 17];3:32-3. Available from: http://www.jascp.com/text.asp?2022/3/1/32/340878



Dear Editor,

With the possibility of including vaccines in the set of interventions for the prevention and control of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) in India, the government undertook a massive drive to train the health workforce in December 2020.[1] Participation in the training programs for COVID-19 vaccination has given us firsthand experience in practicing some of the principles of health education and training, and we have summarized the key features of this initiative in the following points:


  Cascading Nature Top


Training of master trainers was done for various levels, i.e., national, state, district, and block.[1] For COVID-19 vaccines, the training programs were more intensive and completed in a time-bound manner compared to previous programs. As the resource persons for these training were master trainers for each hierarchy level, it built the participants' trust in the training program.


  Content Top


The ministry provided all the training material including PowerPoint presentations for all topics, video films, and a manual of operational guidelines.[2] This ensured consistency in the messages which were delivered in the training workshops throughout the country.


  Timing Top


The government was yet to decide about the vaccine to be used in the program, and the participants needed to be convinced about the training session's timeliness. Two points proved to be crucial here. The candidate vaccines had common characteristics, namely, liquid form, intramuscular route of administration, the storage temperature of 2°C to 8°C, and two doses at 3–4-week interval.[2] This information was sufficient to plan the rollout. Another fact was the visible multipronged preparation strategy where arrangements for funding, cold chain space, site selection, advocacy and social mobilization, identification, and training of human resource was being done simultaneously.[3] This strategy would reduce the latent time between approval and actual vaccination.


  Reinforcement Top


The training was designed to include lectures followed by a short animated film that reiterated the critical learning points. The participants were also given a module on operational guidelines for reference and a link to the website, which provided access to all training material for self-learning.


  Hands-on Experience Top


Dry runs were organized within a week of the training, which gave the participants the opportunity to set up the vaccination site, rehearse conduct of the vaccination, operate the Co-WIN app, and test AEFI management protocols. The teams could identify and rectify the gaps and report their experience to authorities for corrective action.[4]


  Feedback Top


The participants were the medical officers, staff nurses, and auxiliary nurse-midwives who had rich field experience. Throughout the training, feedback was sought from the participants. Their queries were either answered or reported to the district/state/national authorities. It was heartening that the ministry published frequently asked questions that included responses to many of the questions which were raised in the training program.[5]


  Comprehension Top


When the training program was planned at the district and block level, posttraining assessment forms were made available, which helped the organizers gauge the participants' understanding – those who did not score well on the posttraining assessment forms needed to re-attend the training.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. Central Government Gears Up for Roll Out of COVID19 Vaccine. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India; December 25, 2020. Available from: https://pib.gov.in/PressReleseDetailm.aspx?PRID=1683529. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 22].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
COVID-19 Vaccines Operational Guidelines. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. Available from: https://www.mohfw.gov.in/pdf/COVID19VaccineOG111 Chapter 16.pdf. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 22; Last updated on 2020 Dec 28].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. New Digital Platform 'CO-WIN' is being used for COVID-19 Vaccination Delivery. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India; December 08, 2020. Available from: https://pib.gov.in/PressReleseDetail.aspx?PRID=1679181. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 22].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. COVID-19 Vaccine Dry Run Held across India. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India; January 02, 2021. Available from: https://pib.gov.in/PressReleaseIframePage.aspx?PRID=1685611. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 22].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Frequently Asked Questions on COVID-19 Vaccine. Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. Available from: https://www.mohfw.gov.in/pdf/FrequentlyAskedQuestionsonCOVID19vaccineGeneralPublicEnglish.pdf. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 22].  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Cascading Nature
Content
Timing
Reinforcement
Hands-on Experience
Feedback
Comprehension
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed51    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded9    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]